Eastern and Central Europe

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This paper analyses managers’ perceptions and strategic responses to increasing media competition in three European countries with strong public broadcasting traditions. Of particular interest is how the historic public service mission is being refined, redefined, or rejected in today’s highly competitive contexts.

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Confronted with technological, political and social changes, most public service broadcasters in Western Europe have lost the unquestionable ‘license to operate’ in the digital age. While research has focused on adaptation strategies for public service broadcasters, communicative legitimacy management has received insufficient attention.

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The project deals with the development of Public Service Media (PSM) regulation in Poland since the socio-political transition of 1989 until today. The term regulation should be understood in the wider context of Participatory Media Governance, which then would allow civil society members to be included in the investigation.

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This empirical paper examines the issue of willingness to pay (WTP) for public service media (PSM) in Austria and neighboring Germany. Therefore, a non-representative quantitative online survey (N = 1,633) was conducted in June and July 2016 in both countries.

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Young audiences seem to be hard to reach for Public Service Media [PSM] in an increasingly fragmented media landscape. This paper contributes to the necessity to examine attitudes, eval-uations and expectations of young recipients towards PSM.

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The EU’s MEDIA programmes have aimed to “strive for a stronger audiovisual sector reflecting Europe’s cultural identity and heritage” (European Commission, 2012).

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In recent decades Public Service Media (PSM) in Europe have been experimenting with innovations in the production, distribution and content of online news and journalism.

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How do the processes of cultural inclusion and exclusion take place, while PSM offers broadcasting service for the members of the state? This paper examines the PSM and its cultural diversities by focusing on the Kurdish broadcasting in Turkey and in Europe.

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Almost two decades ago, public service broadcasters discovered the internet (see e.g. Moe 2008a). By implementing online platforms, they crossed the boundaries of radio and television as their traditional channels. Today, public service broadcasters in European countries have successfully established online platforms (see e.g. Brevini 2013) and therefore became public service media (PSM).

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Public service media (PSM) have enjoyed a continued presence as mainstream media in many European media systems, and beyond. Traditionally, public service was organised in centralised and paternal institutions (Williams, 1968), part of an exercise of political unification under the roof of the nation state (Gellner, 1983) and of a cultural civilization (Bauman, 1992: 7-9).

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